2018 Golden Globes Driven by Feminism and Social Awareness

   This 75th Golden Globe Awards was certainly more than just an awards show; it was a compelling night fueled by not only historic award recipients but also powerful speeches. With both outfit choices and acceptance speeches revolving around prevention and awareness of sexual harassment in the workplace, both the “Time’s Up” and “#MeToo” movements took center stage.

   The night began with a sea of black on the red carpet. In support of the anti-sexual harassment group “Time’s Up,” most women—and men—sported all black attire to raise awareness for the social issue. Some, however, chose to go against the blackout, but certainly did not get away without critiques. Actress Blanca Blanco, specifically, wore a rather revealing red dress on the carpet that night and definitely turned heads, and not in a good way.

   Most winners of the various awards seemed to center their speeches around social awareness and sexual harassment prevention, specifically paying tribute to the women who have found the courage and bravery to speak out while also addressing gender inequality.

   Nicole Kidman, winner of best actress in a Mini-series for her performance in “Big Little Lies,” did not shy away from the topic. The actress steered away from a typical acceptance speech and did not thank her family or children. Instead, she seemed to only praise her female co-stars such as Reese Witherspoon and Shailene Woodley. “Wow! The power of women!,” said Kidman of her co-stars.

   Natalie Portman also highlighted the gender gap in the film industry during her presentation of the Best Director Award. She used her time on stage to call out the gender inequality in Hollywood, firmly stating, “And here are all the male nominees,” which was followed by an awkward laugh from her co-presenter Ron Howard.  

   There were some highlights however that did not include a hash-tag. Sterling K. Brown, who won “Best Actor in a TV Series (Drama)” for his performance in “This Is Us,” also took the stage to voice his feelings. He was the first black man ever to win the award in the 75-year history of the Golden Globes.

   “What I appreciate so much about this thing is that I am being seen for who I am and being appreciated for who I am. And that makes it that much more difficult to dismiss me, or dismiss anybody who looks like me,” said Brown.

   Oprah Winfrey, the first black woman to be presented with the Cecil B. DeMille award, arguably gave the most notable speech of the night. It was expected that Winfrey speak with passion about feminism and social justice, and her speech did not fall short of that expectation. Oprah made Time’s Up more than a hash-tag by weaving it through part of her speech denouncing abusive men in the workplace.

   “Their time is up. Their time is up! Their time is up,” said Winfrey on the subject of power-abusive men, “So I want all the girls watching here now to know that a new day is on the horizon…And when that new day finally dawns, it will be because of a lot of magnificent women…and some pretty phenomenal men, fighting hard to make sure that they become the leaders who take us to the time when nobody ever has to say ‘Me too’ again.”

   While the mix of awards and politics have been unprecedented, it cannot be disregarded that there were many memorable award winners. “Lady Bird,” won both Best Motion Picture (Musical or Comedy), as well as Best Actress (Saoirse Ronan), and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri,” ended the night on a high note and took home a whopping four awards: Best Motion Picture (Drama), Best Actress (Frances McDormand), Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture (Sam Rockwell) and Best Screenplay in a Motion Picture (Martin McDonagh).

   The 2018 Golden Globes was definitely one that will not be forgotten. The awards show certainly did not fail to recognize all that Hollywood has to offer, especially with the historical award recipients. The night however may be most remembered by the presidential rumor that has spread through social media and beyond: Oprah 2020.

 

Best Motion Picture – Drama: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

 

Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy: Lady Bird

 

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama: Frances McDormand (Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri)

 

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama: Gary Oldman (Darkest Hour)

 

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy: Saoirse Ronan (Lady Bird)

 

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy: James Franco (The Disaster Artist)

 

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture: Allison Janney (I, Tonya)

 

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture: Sam Rockwell (Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri)

 

Best Director – Motion Picture: Guillermo del Toro (The Shape of Water)

 

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture: Martin McDonagh (Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri)

 

Best Motion Picture – Animated: Coco

 

Best Motion Picture – Foreign Language: In the Fade (Germany, France)

 

Best Original Score – Motion Picture: Alexandre Desplat (The Shape of Water)

 

Best Original Song – Motion Picture: “This is Me” written by Justin Paul and Benj Pasek (The Greatest Showman)

 

Best Television Series – Drama: The Handmaid’s Tale

 

Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy: The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

 

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television: Big Little Lies

 

Best Performance by an Actress in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television: Nicole Kidman (Big Little Lies)

 

Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television: Ewan McGregor (Fargo)

 

Best Performance by an Actress In A Television Series – Drama: Elisabeth Moss (The Handmaid’s Tale)

 

Best Performance by an Actor In A Television Series – Drama: Sterling K. Brown (This Is Us)

 

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy: Rachel Brosnahan (The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel)

 

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy: Aziz Ansari (Master of None)

 

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television: Laura Dern (Big Little Lies)

 

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television: Alexander Skarsgård

 

Cecil B. DeMille Award: Oprah Winfrey

 

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